Sunday, November 10, 2013

Izannah walker dolls, Stage 2 making them look old

This is a continuation of the previous post, where at stage 1 the dolls had been painted with one coat of oil paint and were drying, waiting for the next stage which I will call ( stage 2 ). This is where the original coat of paint has dried and we have gone on to the distressing and staining with our oil paint. This method is not for the faint of heart, but you have to have a good brave constitution, able to withstand the  brutal infliction that is visited on your sweet little dolly's. HaHa  I have heard many conversations that went like this: I want to add some ageing, but I'm afraid I will not like it, or I might not be able to fix my doll back to the original face she had, or I think dolls we make today should only be inspired dolls, not exact copies of any original antique dolls, or I really don't like the dolls that are in  the ragged state, but gently aged, or at some point in the future I might like to try to make an old looking doll, I could go on and on, but for those of you who really want to learn how to age your doll, I think this will help you. What has taken place on these three good little soldiers is this: I took my doll after one coat of oil paint that has dried, and I got out my super rough sand paper and turned it up on edge, making cutting vertical strokes down the fore head, and at various other places on the face, neck, hair, and shoulders, and the ears too. Now, unless you are the Hulk, you will not apply enough pressure to actually cut the fabric, but to abraise it. After this, you will then get out your ( secret weapons ),  mine is my trusty dental pick. Start from the top of fore head and gently, I did say gently, start picking at the face. it will pull out the fabric and make small picks that will later pick up and absorb the stain, so it will make a fabulous faux tear or rip in the cloth. Once again I warn you, if you are Hercules, and have the strength of twenty men in one hand, you must not be over zealous, but only want to show some wear, not rip our doll to pieces. HaHa  ain't this fun. Continue down over all head,  face and shoulders and some on the ears too, can't leave those out. Now after you are satisfied that your dolly looks as old as the day is long, we can mix up our stain. mix up in a cup about 1/4 inch  cold pressed lindseed oil, mix in 1/4 inch burnt umber oil paint and 1/4 inch black oil paint and stir up real good. Brush on over all doll head and shoulders. wipe off and let dry. the end. It's the end because I'm out of space. Haha. See you next for stage 3



8 comments:

  1. This is generous of you to share your technique. Generosity amongst artists is a beautiful thing.

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  2. This was SO FUN! haha. You really crack me up, lady.

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  3. Martha, your dolls just tug at my heart! Thanks for sharing your technique.

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  4. Thanks for sharing, going to give this a go when I get used to oils.

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  5. I love the old distressed look you give to your dolls! However, I am afraid my doll sculpts have enough rough spots of their own without going for the dental pick! And, as slow as I have been as of late, they are quite aged by the time they are finished! Ha!

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  6. Wonderful aging technique. With the few Izzie's I made I have to admit I was faint at heart to withstand the brutal infliction of distressing and aging the dolls, so I did a very light stain. It's difficult for me even to distress fabric. If ever I make another Izzie style doll, your technique will come in handy.

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  7. Thanks for sharing this technique Martha!

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